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Treatment of Burns Exposed to Glacial Acetic Acid Dough
Journal of Korean Burn Society 2023;26(2):54-57
Published online December 1, 2023
© 2023 Journal of Korean Burn Society.

Chi Young Bang, M.D., Ph.D.1, Seung Ho Lee, M.D.1, Suk Joon Oh, M.D., Ph.D.1, Sang-Yeul Lee, M.D., Ph.D.1, Chanho Jeong, M.D.1 and Kun-Yong Sung, M.D., Ph.D.1,2

1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kangwon National University Hospital, 2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea
Correspondence to: Kun-Yong Sung, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kangwon National University College of Medicine, 156 Baengnyeong-ro, Chuncheon 24289, Korea
Tel: 82-33-258-4909, Fax: 82-33-258-4920
E-mail: ps@kangwon.ac.kr
Received August 14, 2023; Revised September 27, 2023; Accepted October 10, 2023.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
As chemicals become common in everyday life, serious burns are increasing due to chemicals. Chemical burns are characterized by continuous tissue destruction until the harmful substances are neutralized. The longer the skin is in contact with the chemical, the deeper the burn can be. In cases of chemical burns caused by glacial acetic acid, the burns were caused by a mixture of a small amount of glacial acetic acid and a large amount of flour. Despite the prolonged contact with the dough, tissue damage was managed through debridement and split thickness skin graft, leading to relatively good results.
Keywords : Chemical burn, Glacial acetic acid, Split thickness skin graft


December 2023, 26 (2)
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